Category Archives: Computers

DNS Benchmark

Domain Name Speed Benchmark
Are your DNS nameservers impeding your Internet experience?
divider

A unique, comprehensive, accurate & free Windows (and Linux/Wine) utility to determine the exact performance of local and remote DNS nameservers . . .

“You can’t optimize it until you can measure it”

Now you CAN measure it!

https://www.grc.com/dns/benchmark.htm

***** Good and it works – WTJR Eng Dept 12-15-14

Hyper Terminal for Windows 7

HyperTerminalWin7 (click to download)
If you’ve recently upgraded to Windows 7 and are wondering what happened to HyperTerminal, you’re not alone! HyperTerminal was a sweet little program that let you connect to other computers, Telnet sites, host computers, BBSs, etc using your modem or Ethernet connection.
In Windows 7 and Vista, you will no longer find the HyperTer minal program. If you need HyperTerminal to control serial devices, there is a way to get it back!
****- Download and install it works for me – WTJR Engineering

Fillezilla ftp Server Setup

From http://lifehacker.com/339887/build-a-home-ftp-server-with-filezilla
Build a Home FTP Server with FileZilla

Upload and download files on your home PC from anywhere by turning it into a personal FTP server. With a home FTP server, you can upload and download files on your home hard drive from the office, your friend’s house, or to your laptop while you’re on the road using any FTP client. Setting up an FTP server may sound like a complicated undertaking only system administrators can handle, but it’s actually quite easy and free with open source software FileZilla. You’ve already heard of FileZilla’s FTP client application, but the FileZilla project also offers a server application for Windows. Today we’ll build an FTP server on your Windows PC with FileZilla for easy file transfers from any computer.

Note: Back in ’05, guest poster Matt Haughey covered how to set up an FTP server using Serv-U FTP—which is a fine commercial application, but its personal edition limits how many users can log into your server. We love our open source software, which is why we’re taking a look at FileZilla, which has all the features, with none of the price tag or limits.

Install the FileZilla FTP Server
The FileZilla server installation is a regular Windows “just press Next” wizard, and for most users, the suggested default settings will work. However, let’s take a look at its initial settings anyway, since they’ll affect how you work with your server. Here’s how to get FileZilla going:

Download the FileZilla server application. Even though the FileZilla FTP client is available for multiple operating systems, the server app is Windows-only (and works for Windows XP, Vista and 2000). Download it and kick off the installation wizard. As of this writing, the latest server version is 0.9.25.

Run the server as a Windows Service. First FileZilla will give you the option of how it should start up: as a Windows service or not, automatically or manually. Windows services are processes that run on your PC which you can manage from the Services management pane. There’s more on how to manage that below, but at this point, running FileZilla as a Windows service that runs automatically is the default option. If you want your FTP server on by default, choose “Start as service, started automatically (default)” as shown. Otherwise, choose “Start as service, started manually.”

In this pane you’ll also set the port for the admin interface to use. By default it’s 14147, and you’re most likely safe leaving it at that. If you do change that port number, make a note of what it is—you’ll need it to connect to the server later on.

Set the server administrative interface to launch automatically (or not). On the final installation dialog, choose whether you want the server admin window to launch automatically when the current Windows user logs on, when any user logs on, or if it should be started manually.

Run and connect to the server with the admin interface. As the installation wizard completes, set it to start the server admin interface. This is the window where you’ll configure your server and monitor its activity. The first time you run the admin interface, it will ask you for the server’s address and port. Since the server is running on your PC—the same one the admin interface is running on—its address is localhost, or 127.0.0.1. The default port is 14147 (or whatever you may have changed it to, as noted above), as shown:

If this is the only FTP server you’ll be administering (most likely it is), check off the “Always connect to this server” box to bypass this dialog in the future.
Create Server Users
If all’s gone well, your server’s up and running—but no one can use it yet, since you haven’t given anyone permission. To set up a server user, from the Edit menu choose Users. In the Users dialog on the right hand side, hit the Add button to create a new user and assign a password. Then, on the left side, select “Shared Folders” to set what folders that user will have access to on your server. Here I’ve created a user named gina and granted read access to the C:\data\ directory.

Notice you can fine-tune file access rights for each user: grant read-only rights (download only), write rights (to upload files), and whether or not the user can delete files or create directories, too.

If you want to grant several users access to your server all with the same rights and directory access, instead of creating each one individually, set up a user group. For example, if you’re sharing your MP3 directory with friends, make a user group called “music fans” with access to the correct directory and add users to that group, which automatically gives them those rights. Then, if you move your music directory you only have to edit the group, not each user in it. To manage user groups, from the Edit menu, choose Groups.

Log into the Server
Now that the server’s up and running with users, it’s time to log in and try uploading and downloading. Using any FTP client (like the FileZilla client or FireFTP for Firefox) enter the server address, user name and password.

Server address If you’re FTP’ing across your home network (like from your upstairs PC to your bedroom PC), you can reach the server by using its internal network address (most likely something like 192.168.xx.xx.) From the command line, type ipconfig to see what that address is. If you want to log into your FTP server over the internet, set up a memorable URL for it and allow connections from outside your network. To do so, check out how to assign a domain name to your home server and how to access your home server behind a router and firewall.
User name and password This is one of the users you set up in FileZilla’s admin interface, not the server admin user name. If friends, family, and co-workers will be logging into your FTP server, give them each a their specific username and password to log in (along with the server address.)
Use your FTP server to fetch files stored at home from anywhere, share files with friends and family, or back up files across your network. (Free backup software SyncBack supports backup over FTP. Here’s more on how to use Syncback.)

A word about security: FTP is not a secure protocol; all the file transfers happen in the clear, which makes them ripe for sniffing. FileZilla does support encrypted FTP access, and we recommend using that or a VPN like Hamachi to secure file transfers over the internet. FileZilla’s secure FTP server setup is beyond the scope of this article, but you can go into the server admin interface’s settings area to configure it.

Starting and Stopping Your Server in Windows Services
Finally, to shut down or restart your FileZilla server running as a Windows service, from Control Panel, Administrative Tools, launch Services. Right-click on the FileZilla FTP Server item on the list to stop it, edit its Properties, or restart it, as shown.

Other home servers you can set up yourself include a home web server with Apache, a home SSH server with Cygwin and a home VNC server to remote control your computer.

By Gina Trapani, the editor of Lifehacker, likes to FTP just about any time of the day. Her weekly feature, Geek to Live, appears every Monday on Lifehacker. Subscribe to the Geek to Live feed to get new installments in your newsreader.
____________________________________________________________________
Windows Firewall
“Setting up FileZilla Server with Vista and Windows Firewall

If you are having problems with setting up FileZilla Server to run behind Windows Firewall (specifically, it fails on “List” and the client receives a “Failed to receive directory listing” error), you must add the FileZilla Server application to Windows Firewall’s Exceptions list. To do this, follow these steps:
Open Windows Firewall under Control Panel.
Click on the link that says “Allow a program through Windows Firewall”
Click “Add program…”
Do NOT select “FileZilla Server Interface” from the list, instead click on “Browse…”
Locate the directory you installed FileZilla Server to (normally “C:\Program Files\FileZilla Server”)
Double click or select “FileZilla server.exe” and press open (Once again, NOT “FileZilla Server Interface.exe”)
Select “FileZilla server.exe” from the list and click “Ok”
Verify that “FileZilla server.exe” is added to the exceptions list and that it has a check mark in the box next to it
Press “Ok” to close the window

Passive mode should now work. If you are still having problems connecting (from another computer or outside the network) check your router settings.”
http://wiki.filezilla-project.org/Network_Configuration bottom of page

Tested on lan works WTJR ENG

Internet
http://lifehacker.com/127276/geek-to-live–how-to-access-a-home-server-behind-a-routerfirewall?tag=softwaretop

Webstream WME 9 Auto restart

When streaming with widows media encoder 9 sometimes the stream goes down or locks up. This post will address these issues. (The following was done on a win XP computer and it works.)

Part one.

Encoder restart:
Based on a post here:
http://www.serverroom.us/mediapulltutorial

How To Automate Live Streaming With Windows Media Encoder, Windows media Encoder reconnect.

This article will explain how to have Windows Media Encoder automatically reconnect (always stay encoding), and also explain how to have Windows Media Encoder automatically start encoding at boot up, for example in case of a power outage.
Saving Configuration

1. Save your Windows Media Encoder configuration as C:encoderconfig.wme
windows media pull tutorial
Downloading

2. Download this Zip file and unzip the two files ( reconnect.vbs and startencoding.bat ) onto your C:      WME Download files
Testing files

3. Make sure Windows Media Encoder isn’t currently running, and test the startencoding.bat file by double clicking it. You should see Windows Media Encoder start up, and a few seconds later start encoding.

Click “Stop Encoding” in your encoder and wait 10 seconds.  You should see your encoder automatically start encoding again.

If the encoder never started encoding and didn’t display an error, make sure reconnect.vbs is located on your C:.  You may also try double clicking it manually to test if it works (while the encoder is open).
Test Passed

Start encoding on reboot.

4. If the test passed, place a shortcut to startencoding.bat in your Startup directory by dragging it to Start -> Programs -> Startup
windows media pull tutorial
Computer Settings

5. Make sure your computer is set to automatically logon.

For 2000 and XP instructions, see below

Reboot the computer and make sure Windows Media Player starts and begins encoding.  You may also want to check your computer’s BIOS to make sure the power state will always be “ON” or “LAST” after a power outage.  If it is set to “OFF”, the most common default, your computer will not reboot in the case of a power outage.

Now you don’t have to worry about power outages or network anomalies, knowing that your encoding machine will always be encoding. Enjoy your newly found freedom!

WME Download Script files mentioned in post.

Part two

How to reset a WME webstream. Sometimes the stream locks up, server goes up and down or other anomalies take place. This is one method to reset stream every 4 hours (or whatever times you choose) This also could start and stop a stream during certain hours if autorestart script is disabled that is.

Solution setup a macro to start stop encoder 2 to 4 times a day! Also disconnects users so all bandwidth is not used by someone leaving there computer on all night. But most important keeps stream up.(it automates the mouse and mouse clicks!)

(Note old method below for restart purpose use encoder restart method explained above for that this is a reset or start stop time method)

Software Needed the new version is paid, the old version is free search for it if you need free version.
http://www.nkprods.com/nmacro/

nMacro Recorder 1.1

Name: nMacro Recorder
Version: 1.1
Price: FREE (only for non-commercial use)
Size: 375 KB
Release date: 23 SEP 2006
Category: Automation Tool

nmacro-recorder-1.1 (Its getting hard to find so here it is get paid version if you can but if a non-comm this is free)

Create macro to stop and start encoding of WME.
It records mouse movements and saves as a .bat or .exe file. So you can point windows scheduler to that file. Just record stop and start mouse clicks or stop and start as separate files. ( note screen size and position must be maintained of WME encoder because if it changes mouse will click in wrong place I just make WME window max size and make sure windows remembers its position)

After that use windows scheduler to run the macro at the times you choose like midnight and 6:00am. Note you must be logged in for windows scheduler to work. So make sure your automatic windows re-start* includes a autologon.

The following is optional. It is if you want an auto reboot, but you may consider a power outage an auto reboot so read on about autologin also.

*AUTO BOOT Shut Down, Restart, COMPUTER  Log Off XP Using A Batch File – Undocumented feature for XP
(Ok use this to create a .bat point windows scheduler to it once a week or 2 weeks or whatever this is optional but I include here because most computers need rebooted once in a while, you must do an autolog on hack so you do not see login screen, yet you still need a password, try it first if need do hack to logon. The follow is for a remote reboot in our case the remote is windows scheduler is all both will work)

How to shutdown a XP Pro computer when you are connected using RDC (Remote Desktop Connection) using a batch file or RPC (Remote Procedure Command) This is useful if you can’t get to the computer but have remote access to the computer via a network or the Internet.

First To show you what you will see at a command prompt (command.com) when you type: “shutdown /?” Without the ” ” on each end.

c:>shutdown /?
Usage: SHUTDOWN [-i | -l | -s | -r | -a] [-f] [-m \computername] [-t xx] [-c “c
omment”] [-d up:xx:yy]

No args Display this message (same as -?)
-i Display GUI interface, must be the first option
-l Log off (cannot be used with -m option)
-s Shutdown the computer
-r Shutdown and restart the computer
-a Abort a system shutdown
-m \computername Remote computer to shutdown/restart/abort
-t xx Set timeout for shutdown to xx seconds
-c “comment” Shutdown comment (maximum of 127 characters)
-f Forces running applications to close without warning
-d [u][p]:xx:yy The reason code for the shutdown
u is the user code
p is a planned shutdown code
xx is the major reason code (positive integer less than 256)
yy is the minor reason code (positive integer less than 65536)

This is an undocumented feature in XP so I have not found any writeup about it on M$ and everything used here is from other sources. Do not use “cmd” to start the command interpreter (cmd.exe), but type “command” for (command.com. Now you can shutdown the computer by typing “shutdown -s” or to restart the computer type “shutdown -r”

To create a batch file for this you can use notepad, and save the file as .bat in c: (root directory) Here are the 3 most used batch files for shutdown:
1 save as down.bat
shutdown -s
2 save as restart.bat
shutdown -r
3 save as forcedown.bat
shutdown -f
4 save as logoff.bat
shutdown -l
5 save as rpcdown.bat (replace computername with the name of your computer )shutdown -s -m \computernameand this last one is fun in an enviroment using RPC

So that’s a piece of cake, the other options are self explanatory and if you need any help creating the batch file, ask and someone will help

Auto Logon

Here is more then you want to know about the subject most likely but knowledge is power as they say. Remember Windows Scheduler Requires a password so be careful and test this otherwise you may disable widows scheduler kind of the domino effect.

http://www.wtjrtv.org/engineering/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/passwordsxplogon.txt

 

In conclusion;

If all you want is auto restart and reboot on power outage you do not need to use widows scheduler and any of the auto log on methods would work.  You just manually reboot once in a while in that case. Or if you are not concerned about that just use the auto restart script.

So what if you are on a domain? The streamer or VOD computer for that matter does not have to join the domain, the mount points will work use VNC for remote connect. If you just have to join domain, (why?)  ignore auto logon part or experiment with it use auto reconnect script above at min.

 

All the data is posted here for the idea of a computer running all the time with a min of intervention. Needless to say strip it of all software not needed including AV, and windows update, never let it go to sleep or stand by and so on, but that is the topic of another post.

 

In His Service,

Jim W

CPU Current and History

https://kb.wisc.edu/showroom/page.php?id=4927

Intel

The current performance and market leader at the time of this writing is Intel.  Intel is currently the sole supplier of processors for all recent Apple computers (Macbook, Macbook Pro, Mini, iMac etc.) and are found in virtually all major computer manufacturer’s product lineups. Intel’s most current crop of CPUs are the Core iX-series processors which include the i3, i5 and i7; as of January 2011, these series of processors entered their 2nd generation (codenamed “Sandy Bridge” where the 1st generation was codenamed “Nehalem”, differences explained under the special features section).

AMD

AMD is the second largest supplier of processors for personal computers.  Many of their products are found in both high-performance and budget-oriented notebooks as well as low-cost, enthusiast-oriented desktop builds.  The Phenom II and Fusion platforms comprise AMD’s most popular and mainstream offerings at the time of this writing.

Beneath, we provide a chart which compares the relative performance between competing product lines within Intel’s and AMD’s offerings. These are organized by the following three classes: high-end, mid-range and economy.  It is important to note that though this comparison offers a reference of relative performance within each brand, it does not necessarily indicate absolute rankings between competing Intel and AMD products (for instance, the Core i7 is in the same row and category as the Phenom II series but offers superior general performance). Further, the Core iX Mobile series only indicate relative performance for notebook platforms — that is, it is generally not useful to compare them to desktop processors such as the Intel Core i7 or the Phenom II series.

high

i7
(2nd generation “Sandy Bridge”)
X6
Intel Core i7

As Intel’s flagship processor, the i7 is a 64-bit processor offering either 2, 4, or 6 cores of the highest levels of general performance available.  The i7 combines Hyper Threading and Turbo Boost technologies for the most demanding and advanced of applications.
Intel Core i7 Mobile 

Intel’s Core i7 Mobile features unparalleled performance on notebooks, incorporating significant power savings while implementing the same features as the non-mobile i7, Hyper Threading and Turbo Boost. The i7 Mobile is available on notebooks with 2 or 4 cores; currently the 4 core version offers higher performance in some respects but heat and battery life are concerns.
AMD Phenom II X6

AMD’s Phenom II X6 represents the industry’s first consumer class six-core processor. The X6 offers the highest levels of performance ideal for the most intensive of tasks – bolstered by AMD’s new Turbo Core technology, the X6 is able to optimize performance in a variety of situations.

 

i5
(2nd generation “Sandy Bridge”)
x4
Intel Core i5

Based upon the same architecture as the i7, the i5 is also a 64-bit processor that features 2 or 4 cores at a similar class of performance of the i7 processor at a lower cost. The i5 features Turbo Boost and Hyper-Threading technology but do not possess as much cache memory as the i7.
Intel Core i5 Mobile

The Intel Core i5 Mobile while also featuring Hyper Threading and Turbo Boost possesses a similar but lesser class of performance than the Core i7 Mobile with less cache and available in notebooks only with 2 cores. The Core i5 Mobile is a high performance processor with low energy requirements.
AMD Phenom II X4

AMD’s latest generation of consumer class 4 core processors, the quad-core Phenom II X4 chips are designed to deliver performance ideal for all kinds of multimedia as well as in the most demanding of applications such as virtualization.

i3
(2nd generation “Sandy Bridge”)
x3 x2
Intel Core i3

Derived from the same architecture as the higher end i5 and i7, the i3 is available strictly as a dual core processor. Though Hyper Threading is available, it does not feature TurboBoost. The Core i3 processor presents higher levels of performance than the Core 2 at a smaller cost.
Intel Core i3 Mobile

The Intel Core i3 Mobile descends similarly from the i3, presenting a fast, 64-bit computing experience with the intelligent architecture of the i5 Mobile and i7 Mobile. The i3 Mobile features 2 cores and Hyper Threading but does not include Turbo Boost technology
AMD Phenom II X3 & X2

AMD’s Phenom X3 and X2 processors boast 3 or 2 cores that offer excellent performance value; great for all around usage on a small budget all while utilizing AMD’s latest architecture technology seen in the Phenom II X4 series

c2q
Intel Core 2 Quad

The Core 2 Quad features 4 processing cores to optimize gaming, video, and image processing. Built on the same architecture as the Core 2 Duo, this processor excels on multi-tasking with performance hungry applications.
c2e
Intel Core 2 Extreme

Available in both 2 and 4 core versions, distinguishing features of the Extreme series include higher bus speeds than the non-extreme versions, and an unlocked clock multiplier for further customization of your computing performance.

midrange

i3 phix4phix3
Intel Core 2 Duo

Contains two processing cores to optimize gaming, video, and image processing. Laptops with this chip tend to be thinner and and more energy-efficient.
AMD Phenom I X3 & Phenom I X4

AMD’s first generation of consumer class processors featuring quad and triple core performance found in desktop builds. Features 64-bit computing performance as well as AMD’s HyperTransport bus technology.
pdc amdturioniix2
Intel Pentium Dual Core

Dual core processor based on the Core microarchitecture. A class beneath the Core 2 Duo and Core Duo of Intel’s processor offerings, the Pentium Dual Core is available in current desktops and laptops.
AMD Turion II Ultra / AMD Turion II

The Turion II and Turion II Ultra are AMD’s mainstream mobile processor platform; they provide excellent all-around performance for multimedia such as high definition video. As these are often paired with AMD/ATI graphics, budget configurations containing these processors are also sufficient for basic 3D graphics and gaming.
cd cs amdathiix2
Intel Core Duo / Intel Core Solo

The Intel Core Duo and Core Solo are dual and single core processors based on the Core microarchitecture. The Core Duo and Core Solo offers modest performance for office and limited multimedia oriented tasks.
AMD Athlon II X2

The AMD Athlon II X2 is a 2 core desktop processor that is 80% faster than it’s single core counterpart. Great for multitasking and multimedia consumption on a budget.

economy

centrino sempron
Intel Centrino/Centrino Duo

A mobile-oriented processor based upon Pentium M or Core Duo architectures; the Centrino also integrates wireless networking technology allowing for smaller sized laptops. Offers slight performance boost over simply choosing a core duo and dell wireless card (which is typically less expensive.)
AMD Sempron

The AMD Sempron is a budget class processor seen in low cost notebooks and desktops and are considered a class above netbook/nettop processors such as the Intel Atom or the AMD Neo platforms.
atom neo
Intel Atom

Primarily found in netbooks and nettops, this processor has been designed with price and power consumption in mind. As a result, it offers much less processing power than other current Intel alternatives. This processor is available in 1 or 2 cores, with the single core option being far more prevalent.
AMD Athlon Neo / Neo X2

The Athlon Neo and Neo X2 are single and dual core processors seen in ultra-mobile platforms such as netbook and nettops. They are featured with ATI integrated graphics for reasonable multimedia playback performance.
celeron
Intel Celeron

Intel’s economy model processor. It is the most basic, and thus the slowest. It has less cache than other Intel processors, so even if it has the same Ghz rating as another processor, it will be slower. We usually do not recommend this processor because it offers the least in terms of longevity.

benchmarks

This is not meant to be a comprehensive list, but rather a way to identify different branches in processors. To see a more comprehensive comparison of specific processor types, follow the benchmark links below. Benchmark websites rank processors within and between series. The highest rated processors are typically used for server applications and for simplicity, those products are omitted in the set of rankings above (eg. Intel Xeon and AMD Opteron); rather the processors that are found in desktops and notebooks are included.

It is further important to recognize that general processor speed is not solely atttributed by its frequency — these are the Mhz and Ghz numbers often seen — of the processor when comparing between different product lines as is the common misconception. For instance, an Intel Pentium 4 3.8 Ghz processor is slower than an Intel Core Duo or AMD Phenom. The primary reasons for this is a function of the architecture and the associated features therein (particulrly additional physical cores, advancing of bus technology, etc). It is thus, only applicable comparing frequency ratings to ascertain relative performance within exact product lines (eg. Core 2 Duo vs. Core 2 Duo). The chart beneath will give a rough idea of the hierarchy of performance expected in faring against competing product lines at the time of this writing. It may also be helpful to understand that versions of processors found in desktops tend to be higher in performance than their notebook counterparts of the same product line; this is done to maintain thermal requirements, battery life and minimize size at the cost of speed.

Benchmark Links:

Desktop CPU Benchmarks:

Mobile CPU Benchmarks:

Product Information from Manufacturers:

 

 

Intel http://www.intel.com/pressroom/kits/quickrefyr.htm

2008
December 2008
Intel® Core™2 Extreme Q9000 2 GHz
Intel® Core™2 Duo processor T9800 2.93 GHz

Intel® Core™2 processor P9600 2.66 GHz
Intel® Core™2 processor T9550 2.66 GHz

Intel® Core™2 processor 8700
2.53 GHz

November, 2008
Intel® Core™ i7-965 Extreme Edition
2.66 GHz

Intel® Core™ i7-940
2.66 GHz

Intel® Core™ i7-920
2.66 GHz

September, 2008
Intel® Xeon® Processor MP X7460
2.66 GHz

Intel® Xeon® Processor MP L7455
2.13 GHz

Intel® Xeon® Processor MP L7445
2.13 GHz

Intel® Xeon® Processor MP E7450
2.40 GHz

Intel® Xeon® Processor MP E7440
2.40 GHz

Intel® Xeon® Processor MP E7430
2.13 GHz

Intel® Xeon® Processor MP E7420
2.13 GHz

August, 2008
Intel® Core™2 Extreme QX9300
2.53 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Quad Q9100
2.26 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor SP9400
2.40 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor SP9300
2.26 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor SL9400
1.86 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor SL9300
1.60 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor SU9400
1.40 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor SU9300
1.20 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Solo SU3300
1.20 GHz

Intel® Celeron® Processor 723
1.20 GHz

July, 2008
Intel® Core™ Extreme Processor X9100
3.06 GHz

Intel® Core™ Duo Processor T9600
2.80 GHz

Intel® Core™ Duo Processor P9500
2.53 GHz

Intel® Core™ Duo Processor T9400
2.53 GHz

Intel® Core™ Duo Processor P8600
2.40 GHz

Intel® Core™ Duo Processor P8400
2.26 GHz

June, 2008
Intel® Atom™ Processor N270
1.60 GHz

Intel® Atom™ Processor 230
1.60 GHz

April, 2008
Intel® Atom™ Processor Z500
800 MHz

Intel® Atom™ Processor Z510
1.10 GHz

Intel® Atom™ Processor Z520
1.33 GHz

Intel® Atom™ Processor Z530
1.60 GHz

Intel® Atom™ Processor Z540
1.86 GHz

Intel® Celeron® Dual-Core Processor E1400
2 GHz

Intel® Celeron® Processor 570
2.66 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor E8300
2.83 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor E7200
2.53 GHz

February, 2008
Intel® Core™2 Extreme Processor QX9775
3.20GHz

January, 2008
Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor X3350
2.83 GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor X3350
2.66 GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor X3320
2.50 GHz

Dual-core Intel® Xeon® Processor E3110
3 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Extreme Processor X9000
2.80 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor T9500
2.60 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor T9300
2.50 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor T8300
2.40 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor T8100
2.10 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor E8500
3.16 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor E8400
3 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor E8200
2.66 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor E8190
2.66 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Extreme Quad Processor Q9550
2.83 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Extreme Quad Processor Q9450
2.66 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Extreme Quad Processor Q9300
2.50 GHz

2007
December, 2007
Intel® Core™2 Extreme Processor QX9770
3.20GHz

November, 2007
Intel® Core™2 Extreme Processor QX9650
3.0GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor X5482
3.2GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor X5472
3.0GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor E5472
3.0GHz

Intel® Core 2 Extreme Processor E5462
2.80GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor X5460
3.16GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor X5450
3.0GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor E5450
3.0GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor E5440
2.83GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor E5430
2.66GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor E5420
2.50GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor E5410
2.33GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor E5405
2.00GHz

Dual-core Intel® Xeon® Processor X5260
3.33GHz

Dual-core Intel® Xeon® Processor X5272
3.4GHz

Dual-core Intel® Xeon® Processor E5205
1.86GHz

October, 2007
Dual-core Intel® Itanium Processor 9150M
1.66GHz

Dual-core Intel® Itanium Processor 9150N
1.66GHz

Dual-core Intel® Itanium Processor 9140M
1.66GHz

Dual-core Intel® Itanium Processor 9140N
1.6GHz

Dual-core Intel® Itanium Processor 9120N
1.42GHz

Dual-core Intel® Itanium Processor 9130M
1.66GHz

Dual-core Intel® Itanium Processor 9110N
1.6GHz

September, 2007
Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor X7350
2.93GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor L7345
1.86GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor E7340
2.40GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor E7330
2.40GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor E7320
2.13GHz

Quad-core Intel® Xeon® Processor E7310
1.60GHz

Mobile Intel® Core™2 Extreme X7900
2.8GHz

Mobile Intel® Core™2 Extreme T7800
2.6GHz

July, 2007
Intel® Core™2 Extreme quad-core QX6850
2.66-3.0 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Quad Q6700
2.66 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo E6550-E6850
2.33-3.0 GHz

Mobile Intel® Core™2 Extreme X7800
2.6GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor T7200/T7400/T7600
2.0 GHz
2.16 GHz
2.33 GHz

June, 2007
Pentium® Dual Core™ processor E2160
1.80 GHz

Pentium® Dual Core™ processor E2140
1.60 GHz

April, 2007
Intel® Core™2 Extreme quad-core QX6800
2.93 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor E4500
2.2 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor E4400
2.0 GHz

Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor E4300
1.8 GHz

January, 2007
Intel® Core™2 Quad Q6600
2.4 GHz

Back to top
2006
November, 2006
Quad-Core Intel® Xeon™ X5355
2.66 GHz

Quad-Core Intel® Xeon™ X5355
2.33 GHz

Quad-Core Intel® Xeon™ X5355
1.86 GHz

Quad-Core Intel® Xeon™ X5355
1.60 GHz

August, 2006
Dual-Core Intel® Xeon™ 7140M
3.33-3.40 GHz

Dual-Core Intel® Xeon™ 7130M
3.16-3.20 GHz

Dual-Core Intel® Xeon™ 7120M
3 GHz

Dual-Core Intel® Xeon™ 7110M
2.5-2.6 GHz

Intel® Core™ Duo Processor T2300-T2700***
1.66-2.33 GHz

Intel® Core™ Duo LV Processor L2400-L2500***
1.50-1.83 GHz

Intel® Core™ Duo LV Processor L2300 (EOL 5/07)
1.50 GHz

Intel® Core™ Solo Processor T1300-T1400
1.66-1.83 GHz

July, 2006
Intel® Pentium Core™2 Duo Processor
2.6 GHz
2.4 GHz
2.133 GHz
1.866 GHz

Intel® Pentium Core™2 Extreme Processor X6800
2.933 GHz

Intel® Pentium Core™ Solo Processor T1350
1.86 GHz

Dual Core Intel® Itanium® 2 Processor
1.4-1.6 GHz

June, 2006
Dual Core Intel® Xeon® Processor 5100
2.33-3.0 GHz

May, 2006
Dual Core Intel® Xeon® Processor
3.20-3.73 GHz

Dual Core Intel® Xeon® Processor
3 GHz

Dual Core Intel® Xeon® Processor
1.66 GHz

March, 2006
Intel® Celeron® M Processor 430-450
1.73-2.0GHz

Intel® Celeron® M Processor 410/420 (EOL May-07)
1.46-1.60GHz

Intel® Celeron® M ULV Processor 423/443
1.73-2.0GHz

Intel® Core™ Duo ULV Processor U2400-U2500
1.06-1.20GHz

Intel® Core™ Solo ULV Processor U1300***
1.06GHz

February, 2006
Intel® Core™ Duo Processor T2050/2250/2350/2450
1.6/1.73/1.86/2.0 GHz

January, 2006
Intel® Pentium® D Processor 900
2.8 – 3.4 GHz

Intel® Pentium™ Processor Extreme Edition 955
3.46 GHz

Intel® Pentium™ Processor Extreme Edition 965
3.73 GHz

Back to top
2005
November, 2005
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor 662 and 672
3.6 – 3.8 GHz

Dual Core Intel® Xeon® Processor 7000
2.666 – 3 GHz

October, 2005
Dual Core Intel® Xeon® Processor
2.8 GHz

June, 2005
Intel® Celeron® D Processor 351
3.20 GHz

May, 2005
Intel® Pentium® D Processor 800
2.8 – 3.2 GHz

April, 2005
Intel® Pentium® Processor Extreme Edition 840
3.20 GHz

March, 2005
Intel® Xeon® Processor
3.166 – 3.666 GHz

Intel® Xeon® Processor MP
2.666 – 3.666 GHz

February, 2005
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor Extreme Edition supporting HT Technology
3.73 GHz
3.80 GHz (570)

Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor supporting HT Technology 660, 650, 640, and 630
3.60 GHz (660)
3.40 GHz (650)
3.20 GHz (640)
3 GHz (630)

Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor 600
3 – 3.8 GHz

Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor 630-660
3 – 3.6 GHz

January 19, 2005
Intel® Pentium® M Processor 770, 760, 758, 750, 740, and 730
2.13 GHz (770)
2 GHz (760)
1.5 GHz (758)
1.20 GHz (753)
1.86 GHz (750)
1.73 GHz (740)
1.60 GHz (730)

Intel® Celeron® M processor Ultra-Low Voltage 373
1 GHz

Intel® Celeron® M Processor 370
1.5 GHz

January 4, 2005
Mobile Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor supporting HT Technology 552
3.46 GHz

Back to top
2004
November 23, 2004
Intel® Celeron® D Processor 345
3.06 GHz

November 15, 2004
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor Extreme Edition supporting HT Technology
3.46 GHz

November 8, 2004
Intel® Itanium® 2 Processor
1.6 GHz, 9MB L3 Cache
1.6 GHz, 6MB L3 Cache
1.5 GHz, 4MB L3 Cache
1.6 GHz, 3MB L3 Cache

Low Voltage Intel® Itanium® 2 Processor
1.30 GHz

Oct. 20, 2004
Intel® Pentium® M Processor 765
2.10 GHz

September 28, 2004
Mobile Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor supporting HT Technology 548
3.33 GHz

September 22, 2004
Intel® Celeron® D Processor 340
2.93 GHz

August 31, 2004
Intel® Celeron® M Processor 360 and 350
1.4 GHz
1.3 GHz

July 20, 2004
Intel® Pentium® M Processor 738, 733, and 723
1.4 GHz (738)
1.1 GHz (733)
1 GHz (723)

Intel® Celeron® M processor Ultra-Low Voltage 353
900 MHz

June 28, 2004
Intel® Xeon™ Processor MP
3.6 GHz, 3.4 GHz, 3.2 GHz, 3.0 GHz, 2.8 GHz

June 24, 2004
Intel® Celeron® D Processor 335, 330, 325 and 320
2.80 GHz (335)
2.66 GHz (330)
2.53 GHz (325)
2.40 GHz (320)

June 23, 2004
Intel® Pentium® M Processor 725, 715
1.60 GHz (725)
1.50 GHz (715)

June 21, 2004
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor supporting HT Technology 560, 550, 540, 530 and 520
3.60 GHz (560)
3.40 GHz (550)
3.20 GHz (540)
3 GHz (530)
2.80 GHz (520)

June 1, 2004
Mobile Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor 538, 532 and 518
3.20 GHz (538)
3.06 GHz (532)
2.80 GHz (518)

Intel® Celeron® M Processor 340
1.50 GHz

May 10, 2004
Intel® Pentium® M Processor 755, 745 and 735
2 GHz (755)
1.80 GHz (745)
1.70 GHz (735)

April 13, 2004
Intel® Itanium® 2 Processor (with 3 MB L3 cache)
1.60 GHz
1.40 GHz

April 7, 2004
Ultra Low Voltage Intel® Pentium® M Processor
1.10 GHz

Low Voltage Intel® Pentium® M Processor
1.30 GHz

Ultra Low Voltage Intel® Celeron® M Processor
900 MHz

Intel® Celeron® M Processor
1.4 GH

March 2, 2004
Intel® Xeon™ Processor MP
3 GHz (4 MB L3 cache), 2.70 GHz, 2.20 GHz (2 MB L3 cache)

February 2, 2004
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor (90nm)
3.40 GHz, 3.20 GHz, 3.0 GHz, 2.80 GHz

Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor Extreme Edition (0.13 micron)
3.40 GHz

Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor (0.13 micron)
3.40 GHz

January 5, 2004
Intel® Celeron® M Processor 320 and 310
1.3 GHz
1.2 GHz

Back to top
2003
November 12, 2003
Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
2.50 GHz

November 5, 2003
Intel® Celeron® Processor
2.80 GHz

November 3, 2003
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor Extreme Edition
3.20 GHz

October 6, 2003
Intel® Xeon™ Processor
3.20 GHz

September 24, 2003
Intel® Celeron® Processor
2.70 GHz

September 23, 2003
Mobile Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor-M supporting HT Technology
3.20 GHz, 3.06 GHz, 2.80 GHz, 2.66 GHz (533 MHz system bus)

September 8, 2003
Intel® Itanium™ 2 Processor
1.40 GHz (1.5 MB L3 cache)

Low Voltage Intel® Itanium™ 2 Processor
1 GHz (1.5 MB L3 cache)

July 14, 2003
Intel® Xeon™ Processor
3.06 GHz (1 MB L3 cache)

June 30, 2003
Intel® Itanium™ 2 Processor
1.50 GHz

Intel® Xeon™ Processor MP
2.80 GHz

June 23, 2003
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor
3.20 GHz

June 11, 2003
Mobile Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor – M
2.60 GHz

Mobile Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor
3.06 GHz, 2.80 GHz, 2.66 GHz, 2.40 GHz

Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
2.40 GHz

Intel® Celeron® Processor
2.40 GHz, 2.30 GHz, 2.20 GHz

June 2, 2003
Intel® Pentium® M Processor
1.70 GHz
1.20 GHz (Low Voltage)
1 GHz (Ultra Low Voltage)

Back to top
May 21, 2003
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor with Hyper-Threading Technology
2.80C GHz, 2.60C GHz, 2.40C GHz

Back to top
April 16, 2003
Mobile Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor-M
2.50 GHz

April 16, 2003
Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
2.20 GHz, 1.26 GHz

April 14, 2003
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor with Hyper-Threading Technology
3 GHz (800 MHz system bus)

Back to top
March 31, 2003
Intel® Celeron® Processor
2.40 GHz, 2.30 GHz

March 12, 2003
Intel® Pentium® M Processor
1.60 GHz, 1.50 GHz, 1.40 GHz, 1.30 GHz
1.10 GHz (Low Voltage)
900 MHz (Ultra Low Voltage)

March 10, 2003
Intel® Xeon™ Processor
3.06 GHz (533 MHz system bus)

March 10, 2003
Intel® Xeon™ Processor
3 GHz (400 MHz system bus)

Back to top
January 14, 2003
Mobile Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor-M
2.40 GHz (400 MHz PSB)

Ultra Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor-M
933 MHz (133 MHz PSB)

Ultra Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor-M
900 MHz (100 MHz PSB)

Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
2 GHz

Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
866 MHz

Ultra Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
800 MHz

Back to top
2002
November 20, 2002
Intel® Celeron Processor
2.20 GHz, 2.10 GHz

November 18, 2002
Intel® Xeon™ Processor
2.80 GHz, 2.60 GHz, 2.40 GHz, 2 GHz

November 14, 2002
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor
3.06 GHz with Hyper-Threading Technology

November 4, 2002
Intel® Xeon™ Processor MP
2 GHz, 1.90 GHz, 1.50 GHz

Back to top
September 18, 2002
Intel® Celeron® Processor
2 GHz

September 16, 2002
Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
1.80 GHz, 1.70 GHz, 1.60 GHz

Ultra Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
733 MHz, 700 MHz

Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor-M
1.33 GHz, 1.26 GHz

Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor-M
1 GHz

Ultra Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor-M
866 MHz
133 MHz system bus

Ultra Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor-M
850 MHz
100 MHz system bus

Mobile Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor-M
2.20 GHz

September 11, 2002
Intel® Xeon™ Processor
2.80 GHz, 2.60 GHz

Back to top
August 26, 2002
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor
2.80 GHz, 2.66 GHz
533 MHz system bus

Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor
2.60 GHz, 2.50 GHz
400 MHz system bus

Back to top
July 8, 2002
Intel® Itanium® 2 Processor
1 GHz, 900 MHz

Back to top
June 25, 2002
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor for Applied Computing
2.40 GHz

Mobile Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor-M for Applied Computing
1.70 GHz

June 24, 2002
Mobile Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor-M
2 GHz, 1.90 GHz

Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
1.50 GHz, 1.40 GHz, 1.33 GHz

June 12, 2002
Intel® Celeron® Processor
1.80 GHz
0.18-micron

Back to top
May 15, 2002
Intel® Celeron® Processor
1.70 GHz
0.18-micron

Intel® Celeron® Processor
1.40 GHz
0.13-micron

May 6, 2002
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor
2.53 GHz, 2.40 GHz, 2.26 GHz

Back to top
April 23, 2002
Mobile Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor-M
1.80 GHz, 1.50 GHz, 1.40 GHz

Intel® Xeon™ Processor
2.40 GHz

April 17, 2002
Ultra Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor-M
800 MHz
133 MHz system bus

Ultra Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor-M
800 MHz
100 MHz system bus

Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor-M
933 MHz

Low Voltage Mobile Celeron® Processor
733 MHz

Mobile Celeron® Processor
1 GHz

April 3, 2002
Intel® Xeon™ Processor
1 GHz

April 2, 2002
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor
2.40 GHz, 2.20 GHz, 2 GHz

Back to top
March 12, 2002
Intel® Xeon™ Processor MP
1.60 GHz, 1.50 GHz, 1.40 GHz

March 4, 2002
Mobile Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor-M
1.70 GHz, 1.60 GHz

Back to top
February 25, 2002
Intel® Xeon™ Processor
2.20 GHz, 2 GHz, 1.80 GHz

Back to top
January 21, 2002
Ultra Low Voltage Mobile Pentium® III Processor-M
750 MHz

Low Voltage Mobile Pentium® III Processor-M
866 MHz, 850 MHz

Ultra Low Voltage Mobile Celeron® Processor
650 MHz

Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
1.20 GHz, 1.13 GHz, 1.06 GHz

January 9, 2002
Intel® Xeon™ Processor
2.20 GHz, 2 GHz, 1.80 GHz

January 8, 2002
Intel® Pentium® III Processor for servers
1.40 GHz

January 7, 2002
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor
2.20 GHz, 2 GHz

January 3, 2002
Intel® Celeron® Processor
1.30 GHz

Back to top
2001
November 13, 2001
Ultra-Low Voltage Intel® Pentium® III Processor 512K
700 MHz

Back to top
October 2, 2001
Intel® Celeron® Processor
1.20 GHz

October 1, 2001
Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor-M
1.20 GHz

Back to top
September 25, 2001
Intel® Xeon™ Processor
2 GHz

Back to top
August 31, 2001
Intel® Celeron® Processor
1.10 GHz, 1 GHz, 950 MHz

August 27, 2001
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor
2 GHz, 1.90 GHz

Back to top
July 30, 2001
Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor-M
1.13 GHz, 1.06 GHz, 1 GHz, 933 MHz, 866 MHz

July 2, 2001
Pentium® 4 Processor
1.80 GHz, 1.60 GHz

Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
850 MHz

Intel® Celeron® Processor
900 MHz

Back to top
May 29, 2001
Intel® Itanium™ Processor
800 MHz, 733 MHz

May 21, 2001
Intel® Xeon™ Processor
1.70 GHz, 1.50 GHz, 1.40 GHz

Ultra Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor
600 MHz

Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor
750 MHz

Ultra Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
600 MHz

Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
600 MHz

Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
800 MHz

Intel® Celeron® Processor
850 MHz

Back to top
April 23, 2001
Pentium® 4 Processor
1.70 GHz

Back to top
March 21, 2001
Pentium® III Xeon™ Processor
900 MHz

March 19, 2001
Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor
1 GHz, 900 MHz

Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor for Applied Computing
700 MHz

Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
750 MHz

Back to top
February 27, 2001
Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor
700 MHz

Back to top
January 30, 2001
Ultra Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor
500 MHz

Ultra Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
500 MHz

January 3, 2001
Intel® Celeron® Processor
800 MHz

Back to top
2000
November 20, 2000
Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor
1.50 GHz, 1.40 GHz

November 13, 2000
Intel® Celeron® Processor
766 MHz, 733 MHz

Back to top
September 25, 2000
Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor
850 MHz, 800 MHz

Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
700 MHz

Back to top
June 26, 2000
Intel® Celeron® Processor
700 MHz, 667MHz, 633 MHz

June 19, 2000
Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor
600 MHz

Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor
750 MHz

Low Voltage Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
500 MHz

Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
650 MHz, 600 MHz

Back to top
May 24, 2000
Intel® Pentium® III Xeon™ Processor
933 MHz

Intel® Pentium® III Processor
933 MHz

May 22, 2000
Intel® Pentium® III Xeon™ Processor
700 MHz

Back to top
April 24, 2000
Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor
700 MHz

Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
550 MHz

April 10, 2000
Intel® Pentium® III Xeon™ Processor
866 MHz

Back to top
March 29, 2000
Intel® Celeron® Processor
600 MHz, 566 MHz

March 20, 2000
Intel® Pentium® III Processor
866 MHz, 850 MHz

March 8, 2000
Intel® Pentium® III Processor
1 GHz

Back to top
February 14, 2000
Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
500 MHz, 450 MHz

Back to top
January 18, 2000
Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor
650 MHz, 600 MHz

January 12, 2000
Intel® Pentium® III Xeon™ Processor
800 MHz

January 4, 2000
Intel® Celeron® Processor
533 MHz

Back to top
1999
October 25, 1999
Intel® Pentium® III Xeon™ Processor
733 MHz, 667 MHz, 600 MHz

Intel® Pentium® III Processor
733, 700, 667, 650, 600, 550, 533, 500 MHz

Mobile Intel® Pentium® III Processor
500, 450, 400 MHz

Back to top
September 15, 1999
Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
466 MHz, 433 MHz

Back to top
August 2, 1999
Intel® Pentium® III Processor
600 MHz

Intel® Celeron® Processor
500 MHz

Back to top
June 14, 1999
Mobile Intel® Pentium® II Processor
400 MHz (0.18-micron)

Mobile Intel® Pentium® II Processor
400 MHz (0.25-micron)

Intel® Celeron® Processor
400 MHz

Back to top
May 17, 1999
Intel® Pentium® III Processor
550 MHz

Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
366 MHz

Back to top
April 26, 1999
Intel® Celeron® Processor
466 MHz

April 5, 1999
Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
333 MHz

Back to top
March 22, 1999
Intel® Celeron® Processor
433 MHz

March 17, 1999
Intel® Pentium® III Xeon™ Processor
550 MHz, 500 MHz

Back to top
February 26, 1999
Intel® Pentium® III Processor
500 MHz, 450 MHz

Back to top
January 25, 1999
Mobile Intel® Pentium® II Processor
366, 333, 300, 266 MHz

Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor
300 MHz, 266 MHz

January 7, 1999
Mobile Intel® Pentium® Processor
300 MHz

January 5, 1999
Intel® Pentium® II Xeon™ Processor
450 MHz

January 4, 1999
Intel® Celeron® Processor
400 MHz, 366 MHz

Back to top
1998
October 6, 1998
Intel® Pentium® II Xeon™ Processor
450 MHz

Back to top
September 9, 1998
Mobile Intel® Pentium® II Processor
300 MHz

Back to top
August 24, 1998
Intel® Pentium® II Processor
450 MHz

Intel® Celeron® Processor
333 MHz

Intel® Celeron® Processor
300A MHz

Back to top
June 29, 1998
Intel® Pentium® II Xeon™ Processor
400 MHz

June 8, 1998
Intel® Celeron® Processor
300 MHz

Back to top
April 15, 1998
Intel® Celeron® Processor
266 MHz

Intel® Pentium® II Processor
400 MHz, 350 MHz

April 2, 1998
Mobile Intel® Pentium® II Processor
266 MHz, 233 MHz

Back to top
January 26, 1998
Intel® Pentium® II Processor
333 MHz

January 12, 1998
Intel® Pentium® Processor
266 MHz

Back to top
1997
September 8, 1997
Mobile Intel® Pentium® Processor
233 MHz, 200 MHz

Back to top
August 18, 1997
Intel® Pentium® Pro Processor
200 MHz

Back to top
June 2, 1997
Intel® Pentium® Processor
233 MHz

Back to top
May 7, 1997
Intel® Pentium® II Processor
300 MHz, 266 MHz, 233 MHz

Back to top
January 8, 1997
Intel® Pentium® Processor
200 MHz, 166 MHz

Back to top
1996
June 10, 1996
Intel® Pentium® Processor
200 MHz

Back to top
January 4, 1996
Intel® Pentium® Processor
166 MHz, 150 MHz

Back to top
1995
November 1, 1995
Intel® Pentium® Pro Processor
200, 180, 166, 150 MHz

Back to top
June 1995
Intel® Pentium® Processor
133 MHz

Back to top
March 27, 1995
Intel® Pentium® Processor
120 MHz

Back to top
1994
October 10, 1994
Intel® Pentium® Processor
75 MHz

Back to top
March 7, 1994
Intel® Pentium® Processor
100 MHz, 90 MHz

IntelDX4™ Processor
100 MHz, 75 MHz

Back to top
1993
March 22, 1993
Intel® Pentium® Processor
66 MHz, 60 MHz

Back to top
1992
November 9, 1992
Intel486™ SL Processor
33, 25, 20 MHz

Back to top
September 21, 1992
Intel486™ SX Processor
33 MHz

August 10, 1992
IntelDX2™ Processor
66 MHz

March 3, 1992
IntelDX2™ Processor
50 MHz

Back to top
1991
April 22, 1991
Intel486™ SX Processor
33, 25, 20, 16 MHz

Back to top
1990
October 15, 1990
Intel386™ SL Processor
25, 20 MHz

Back to top
1989
April 10, 1989
Intel486™ DX Processor
50, 33, 25 MHz

Back to top
1988
June 16, 1988
Intel386™ SX Processor
33, 25, 20, 16 MHz

Back to top
1985
October 17, 1985
Intel386™ DX Processor
33, 25, 20, 16 MHz

Back to top
1982
February 1982
80286
12, 10, 6 MHz

80186
Used mostly in controller applications

Back to top
1979
June 1979
8088
8 MHz, 5 MHz

Back to top
1978
June 8, 1978
8086
10 MHz, 8 MHz, 5 MHz

Back to top
1976
March 1976
8085
5 MHz

Back to top
1974
April 1974
8080
2 MHz

Back to top
1972
April 1972
8008
500 – 800 Kilohertz (KHz)

Back to top
1971
November 15, 1971
4004
400 Kilohertz (KHz)

Computer memory types

YEAR INTRODUCED TECHNOLOGY SPEED LIMIT
1987 FPM 50ns
1995 EDO 50ns
1997 PC66 SDRAM 66MHz
1998 PC100 SDRAM 100MHz
1999 RDRAM 800MHz
1999/2000 PC133 SRAM 133MHz (VCM option)
2000 DDR SDRAM 266MHz
2001 DDR SDRAM 333MHz
2002 DDR SDRAM 434MHz
2003 DDR SDRAM 500MHz
2004 DDR2 SDRAM 533MHz
2005 DDR2 SDRAM 800MHz
2006 DDR2 SDRAM 667 – 800MHz
2007 DDR3 SDRAM 1066 – 1333MHz
2012 DDR4 ….

FPM – EDO
72-Pin SIMM 100-Pin DIMM

SDRAM
168-Pin DIMM
PC-66
PC-100
PC-133

RDRAM
184 pins
PC800 Rambus RIMM (RDRAM) – 184 pins
PC1066 Rambus RIMM (RDRAM) – 184 pins
PC1200 Rambus RIMM (RDRAM) – 184 pins

Memory Name Frequency (RAM) Frequency (FSB) Speed
184-Pin DIMM
DDR200 PC1600 200 MHz 100 MHz 1.6 Go/s
DDR266 PC2100 266 MHz 133 MHz 2.1 Go/s
DDR333 PC2700 333 MHz 166 MHz 2.7 Go/s
DDR400 PC3200 400 MHz 200 MHz 3.2 Go/s
DDR433 PC3500 433 MHz 217 MHz 3.5 Go/s
DDR466 PC3700 466 MHz 233 MHz 3.7 Go/s
DDR500 PC4000 500 MHz 250 MHz 4 Go/s
DDR533 PC4200 533 MHz 266 MHz 4.2 Go/s
DDR538 PC4300 538 MHz 269 MHz 4.3 Go/s
DDR550 PC4400 550 MHz 275 MHz 4.4 Go/s

Form Factor: 240-Pin DIMM
DDR2-400 PC2-3200 400 MHz 100 MHz 3.2 Go/s
DDR2-533 PC2-4300 533 MHz 133 MHz 4.3 Go/s
DDR2-667 PC2-5300 667 MHz 167 MHz 5.3 Go/s
DDR2-675 PC2-5400 675 MHz 172.5 MHz 5.4 Go/s
DDR2-800 PC2-6400 800 MHz 200 MHz 6.4 Go/s
DDR2 PC2-4200 533MHz 266MHz
DDR2 PC2-5400 667MHz 333MHz
DDR2 PC2-6000 750MHz 375MHz
DDR2 PC2-6400 800MHz 400MHz
DDR2 PC2-8000 1000MHz 500MHz
DDR2 PC2-8800 1100MHz 550MHz
DDR2 PC2-9000 1120MHz 560MHz

Form Factor: 240-Pin DIMM
DDR3 PC3-6400 800MHz 400MHz
DDR3 PC3-8500 1066MHz 533MHz
DDR3 PC3-10666 1333MHz 667MHz
DDR3 PC3-12800 1600MHz 800MHz
DDR3 PC3-14400 1800MHz 900MHz
DDR3 PC3-16000 2000MHz 1000MHz

DDR4
Coming 2012

Check
http://www.memory.com/

MAJOR CHIP TECHNOLOGIES

It’s usually pretty easy to tell memory module form factors apart because of physical differences. Most module form factors can support various memory technologies so, it’s possible for two modules to appear to be the same when, in fact, they’re not. For example, a 168-pin DIMM can be used for EDO, Synchronous DRAM, or some other type of memory. The only way to tell precisely what kind of memory a module contains is to interpret the marking on the chips. Each DRAM chip manufacturer has different markings and part numbers to identify the chip technology.

FAST PAGE MODE (FPM)

At one time, FPM was the most common form of DRAM found in computers. In fact, it was so common that people simply called it “DRAM,” leaving off the “FPM”. FPM offered an advantage over earlier memory technologies because it enabled faster access to data located within the same row.

EXTENDED DATA OUT (EDO)

In 1995, EDO became the next memory innovation. It was similar to FPM, but with a slight modification that allowed consecutive memory accesses to occur much faster. This meant the memory controller could save time by cutting out a few steps in the addressing process. EDO enabled the CPU to access memory 10 to 15% faster than with FPM.

SYNCHRONOUS DRAM (SDRAM)

In late 1996, SDRAM began to appear in systems. Unlike previous technologies, SDRAM is designed to synchronize itself with the timing of the CPU. This enables the memory controller to know the exact clock cycle when the requested data will be ready, so the CPU no longer has to wait between memory accesses. SDRAM chips also take advantage of interleaving and burst mode functions, which make memory retrieval even faster. SDRAM modules come in several different speeds so as to synchronize to the clock speeds of the systems they’ll be used in. For example, PC66 SDRAM runs at 66MHz, PC100 SDRAM runs at 100MHz, PC133 SDRAM runs at 133MHz, and so on. Faster SDRAM speeds such as 200MHz and 266MHz are currently in development.

DOUBLE DATA RATE SYNCHRONOUS DRAM (DDR SDRAM)

DDR SDRAM, is a next-generation SDRAM technology. It allows the memory chip to perform transactions on both the rising and falling edges of the clock cycle. For example, with DDR SDRAM, a 100 or 133MHz memory bus clock rate yields an effective data rate of 200MHz or 266MHz. Click here for more on DDR. Click here for more on DDR.

DOUBLE DATA RATE 2 SYNCHRONOUS DRAM (DDR2 SDRAM)

DDR2 is the second generation of Double Data Rate (DDR) SDRAM memory. It is an evolution of DDR memory technology that delivers higher speeds (up to 800 MHz), lower power consumption and heat dissipation. It is an ideal memory solution for bandwidth hungry systems and the lower power consumption is a perfect match for today’s mobile users. Click here for more on DDR2.

DOUBLE DATA RATE 3 SYNCHRONOUS DRAM (DDR3 SDRAM)

DDR3 is the third generation of Double Data Rate (DDR) SDRAM memory. Similar to DDR2, it is a continuing evolution of DDR memory technology that delivers higher speeds (up to 1600 MHz), lower power consumption and heat dissipation. It is an ideal memory solution for bandwidth hungry systems equipped with dual and quad core processors and the lower power consumption is a perfect match for both server and mobile platforms. DDR3 modules available in the second half of 2007.

DIRECT RAMBUS

Direct Rambus is a DRAM architecture and interface standard that challenges traditional main memory designs. Direct Rambus technology is extraordinarily fast compared to older memory technologies. It transfers data at speeds up to 800MHz over a narrow 16-bit bus called a Direct Rambus Channel. This high-speed clock rate is possible due to a feature called “double clocked,” which allows operations to occur on both the rising and falling edges of the clock cycle. Also, each memory device on an RDRAM module provides up to 1.6 gigabytes per second of bandwidth – twice the bandwidth available with current 100MHz SDRAM. – http://www.kingston.com/tools/umg/umg05a.asp

WEBSTREAM of channel

To watch WTJR Webstream go here http://www.wtjr.org/watch-online

Hello the purpose of this project is stream WTJR on web for as cheap as possible.
WTJR WEBSTREAM PROJECT.

Items required: Video capture card- VIEWCAST OSPREY-100 (or better model, 210, 230,..) $130. Win xp computer – parts $300 (Newegg or Tiger direct) -strip the computer of all start-up and automatic apps. LCD Monitor $150  (I went with a KVM switch instead) UPS power supply CyberPower Home/Office CP685AVR 685VA 390W UPS – Retail $61.99. Audio video wiring to Webstream computer $50 (Program out from source). Video Hum eliminator: (if needed I did at source it works better on that end) Jensen VB-1BB Composite Video Isolator $80. Audio Hum eliminator: (if needed I did) Behringer HD400 2-Channel Hum Destroyer $30.

Webstream Server: Monthly Webstream charge at http://windows.media.serverroom.us/ (or another server)
Service Levels: Windows Media 50 (we used this at first and it works and is cheap 10x cheaper then most, we now have a corp server so we no longer use this.)

DSL 1.5 Meg or better Internet connection:  Upgrade service (done no charge) now 812KB upload speed we will use 300KB for webstream (we are using our DSL with higher upload requested, most have this or better just check to make sure…)

This project is done and now up and running. Notes to follow.

Setup:
Streaming with the Windows Media Encoder 9 series: (At serverrrom.us your setup may be a little different if on a WAN )

In order to broadcast you should have the following components and/or software:
A. Windows Media 9 Encoder (Download software for local computer its free do a search for it to find link)

B. Video encoding card must be software based with windows drivers!
Not mpeg 2 hardware based!. Surprisingly some of the cheaper cards word better in this regard. OSPREY-100 or better is a good pick.

C. Access to a Windows media streaming server. (remote server).

D. DSL or above.

STEP 1 – After starting up the Windows Media Encoder and starting a new session, choose “Broadcast a live event”.

STEP 2 – Next, select, the devices you wish to use to broadcast with.

STEP 3 – Select your broadcast method. (Push method).

STEP 4 – Enter your server address and publishing point. . You will also be prompted for a user name and password.

STEP 5 – Select your desired encoding rates.

STEP 6 – Select whether or not you would like to record your broadcast to a file on your local machine. (Optional.)

STEP 7 – Choose if you would like to use additional files along with your broadcast devices.

STEP 8 – Enter your broadcast information. (Title, author, etc.).

STEP 9 – Click “Start Encoder” button.

CONGRATULATIONS! You are now broadcasting !

That is till server locks up and you need to reconnect! (click encoder stop/start button) This happen once every 48 hours at random so read below.

Solution setup a macro to start stop encoder 2 to 4 times a day! Also disconnects users so all bandwidth is not used by someone leaving there computer on all night. But most important keeps stream up.(it automates the mouse and mouse clicks!)

(Note old method below use encoder restart method explained later)

http://www.nkprods.com/nmacro/

nMacro Recorder 1.1

Name: nMacro Recorder
Version: 1.1
Price: FREE (only for non-commercial use)
Size: 375 KB
Release date: 23 SEP 2006
Category: Automation Tool

Create macro to stop and start encoding.

After that use windows scheduler to run the macro at the times you choose like midnight and 6:00am. Note you must be logged in for windows scheduler to work. So make sure your automatic windows re-start includes a login.

(End old method restart encoder)

REBOOT:
In addition set computer to auto reboot one time per week.
You must have auto windows login set up (a reg hack), and auto encoder start see below, and a macro to get encoder full screen again ( a encoder .bat file that starts and stops encoder would eliminate all macros I have not found that .bat file that stops encoding.)

Encoder restart:
http://www.serverroom.us/mediapulltutorial
How To Automate Live Streaming With Windows Media Encoder, Windows media Encoder reconnect.

This article will explain how to have Windows Media Encoder automatically reconnect (always stay encoding), and also explain how to have Windows Media Encoder automatically start encoding at boot up, for example in case of a power outage.
Saving Configuration

1. Save your Windows Media Encoder configuration as C:encoderconfig.wme
windows media pull tutorial
Downloading

2. Download this Zip file and unzip the two files ( reconnect.vbs and startencoding.bat ) onto your C:
Testing files

3. Make sure Windows Media Encoder isn’t currently running, and test the startencoding.bat file by double clicking it. You should see Windows Media Encoder start up, and a few seconds later start encoding.

Click “Stop Encoding” in your encoder and wait 10 seconds.  You should see your encoder automatically start encoding again.

If the encoder never started encoding and didn’t display an error, make sure reconnect.vbs is located on your C:.  You may also try double clicking it manually to test if it works (while the encoder is open).
Test Passed

4. If the test passed, place a shortcut to startencoding.bat in your Startup directory by dragging it to Start -> Programs -> Startup
windows media pull tutorial
Computer Settings

5. Make sure your computer is set to automatically logon.

For 2000 and XP instructions, see below

Reboot the computer and make sure Windows Media Player starts and begins encoding.  You may also want to check your computer’s BIOS to make sure the power state will always be “ON” or “LAST” after a power outage.  If it is set to “OFF”, the most common default, your computer will not reboot in the case of a power outage.

Now you don’t have to worry about power outages or network anomalies, knowing that your encoding machine will always be encoding. Enjoy your newly found freedom!

WME Download

passwords xp logon

 

 

 

Remote control: Install tightVNC to control computer from outside the building.

________________________________________________________

You must have Broadband to watch stream:
The quality of the stream is 273 KPS Video, 320 x 240,  with high quality audio Windows Media Audio 32 kbps, 22 kHz, stereo (A/V) 1-pass CBR.

This is the min I would use you can bump up from here.

I decided not to embed player but to spawn Wm player as that is the way most prefer to click to watch… if you automatically launch at homepage it kills all dial-ups! Let the viewer choose.

the link: mms://169.130.151.126/wtjr

Note the mms://

The Stream is UP and on the air!